Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-2016

Abstract

Recently, concern has been voiced within the academy regarding the marginalization of legal scholarship within the criminology and criminal justice (CCJ) discipline. Although conventional wisdom and anecdotal evidence indicate that it is difficult to get legal scholarship published in CCJ journals, there is a dearth of empirical evidence on the representation of legal scholarship in CCJ journals. The present study assesses the representation of legal scholarship in 20 CCJ journals from 2005 through 2015, examining both trends over time and variation across journals. Findings indicate legal scholarship comprises a very small portion of articles published, there has been a steep decline in the number of legal articles published in recent years and the average number of legal articles per year is very low for nearly all of the journals in the sample. The implications of the marginalization of legal scholarship within the CCJ discipline are discussed.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1080/10511253.2016.1267242

Comments

This article has been published as:

Rowe, B.I., McCann, W., & Hemmens, C. (2017). Persona non grata: The marginalization of legal scholarship in criminology and criminal justice journals. Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 28(4), 514-541.

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Criminal Justice Education on December 28, 2016, available at https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/10511253.2016.1267242

Brenda I. Rowe, Wesley S. McCann, & Craig Hemmens, Persona non grata: The marginalization of legal scholarship in criminology and criminal justice journals, Journal of Criminal Justice Education, 28(4), pp. 514-541. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. DOI: 10.1080/10511253.2016.1267242

Share

COinS